Churchill's British Resistance - The Auxiliary Units

 

Dinedor “Caleb” Auxiliary Unit Patrol.

Thank you for selecting information on the Dinedor “Caleb” Auxiliary Unit Patrol and Operational Base. The info and images below have been supplied by our internal archive and other sources.

This page was last updated at 8:05am on 31/12/13

Research into this patrol and its training is ongoing. The information below is published from various sources and is by no means conclusive. If information is not listed below it does not necessarily mean the information is not out there but normally means CART researchers have not found it yet.

If you have any information on this patrol or can help with research in this area please do contact us.

Dinedor is a parish south east of Hereford close to the River Wye. Dinedor Hill is the site of an Iron Age hill fort.

Herefordshire formed part of area 19 which also included Worcestershire ( Groups 1a and 1b), Monmouthshire (Group 3) and latterly from 1943 part of Glamorganshire (Groups 4a and 4b).

The first intelligence officer was Captain John Ellerman Todd who had been a London stockbroker before the war. Known to be a character but dressed as the country gent it is believed he lived at Llanfihangel Crucorny in Monmouthshire. Recruited to SOE, Todd was replaced by Captain Christopher Sandford and the area headquarters became Eye Manor near Leominster.

A later Intelligence Officer included Captain Lloyd Bucknell RA.

Dinedor, “Caleb” Patrol was part of Herefordshire Group 2 which consisted of six Patrols: Letton (“Adam”), Leominster  (“Abednigo”), Bromyard (“Jacob”), Walls Hill (“Mechach”) and Symonds Yat (“Shadrach”) Patrols.

Area Group Commander was Captain Geoffrey S E Lacon of Bircher near Leominster
Group commander of these Patrols was Captain J.H.“Hughie” Hall  and Assistant C.Q.M.S. Albert Thomas Pettifer.

Herefordshire, Worcestershire and Monmouthshire Patrols were given Biblical code names. It is assumed this was an initiative of Todd to prevent the use of patrols locations names. 

Currently unknown though thought to be the latter part of 1940.

Sergeant Angus Briton Wilson of Hereford. Died September 1944 and was succeeded by 
Corporal ( Sergeant as from 23rd Sept 1944) Dennis Howard-Smith of Kings Acre, Hereford
Private John Cleland of Dinedor                  
Private John Ryan of Home Lacey                         
Private Ernest Tisdale of Hereford
Private Leslie Hoddell of Hereford               
Private C.H. Williams of Hereford recorded as a later member.

Hereford Auxiliers

Back Row - J F RYAN, J RHYS-THOMAS, J B SAINSBURY, W R ROBINSON, N D O CAPPER, G O SAINSBURY, J E POTTER, G MORGAN-JONES, V BEACH-THOMAS

Next Row - J F HARTWRIGHT, E LEWIS, E F BARNETT, L J HODELL, G GRIFFITHS, J TURNER, H E SAINSBURY, E C TISDALE, G P THOMAS, F J HANCORN, G H CHAMBERS

Next Row - D HOWARD-SMITH, A T PETTIFER, M G HOOTON, G S E LACON, J H HALL, F W GREEN, R E HOLFORD, A BECK

Front Row - D T WENT, J CLELAND, W F PUDGE, J THORNTON, E R PRICE, L EVANS, R G H BROOKS, F MAYO

Photograph by VIVIANS

Photo Copy - Brian JONES Collection Album 2 BJ59

[Source: http://www.old-ledbury.co.uk/Military.htm#mil2]

Thought to be on Dinedor Hill in Dinedor near to Hereford.

The summit of Dinedor Hill would have given views of the roads and railways coming into Hereford.
The OB location would have given easy access to the Royal Ordnance Factory at Rotherwas which would have been a valuable asset to the invaders if left intact.

View from Dinedor Camp

View from Dinedor Camp
© Copyright Pauline Eccles and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

Local training was carried out at Leslie Hoddell's farm at Lyde Court.

Hereford Patrols trained at Holmer Grange, the home of Captain“Hughie” Hall. Auxiliers had memories of a large lake with a pontoon bridge over. An exercise was to run over the pontoon with all their equipment, missing the part of the bridge that was primed to collapse. If they didn't fall in, the instructors pushed them in anyway. A stuffed dummy mounted in a doorway was used for silent killing practice.

A competition between all six patrols took place at a farm at Holmer. Each Patrol had to place a magnet with the Patrols name attached on some farm equipment stored in a yard. Getting in and out without being spotted the victor was”Jacob” Patrol.

Unknown, but it is assumed that they had the standard weapons and explosives issued to all patrols.

Sergeant Angus B Wilson was a seed merchant that died from natural causes on 16th September 1944 and was succeeded by Dennis Howard-Smith on 23rd of September. A group stand down photograph exists which shows a photograph of Wilson's face glued on to a stand-in.

John Ryan was a veterinary surgeon.

It is thought that the OB's secrecy was compromised by an Army officer and his girlfriend. The officer was moved away but it is unknown if another OB was planed.

Along with other patrols from around the country “Shadrach” Patrol were recruited to defend the Isle of Wight in June 1944 during the time of D-Day. Here is a story of others experience of D-Day on the Isle of Wight.

Herefordshire patrols had their first reunion dinner on 26th January1945 at Booth Hall in Hereford.

An article below from a Hereford newspaper about Auxilier John Ryan. Kindly sent to us by Tom Pilling.

John Ryan Hereford Paper Article

TNA WO199/3389 & transcripts from Stephen Lewins. Hancock data held at B.R.A. The Mercian Maquis by Bernard Lowry & Mick Wilks

If you can help with any info please contact us.